I've seen more with these two eyes than with any other part of my body.
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Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal - Class and Media

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Hovertext:
Before you write me an email asking 'what about the middle class,' please understand that I want this comic to still be relevant in 50 years.

New comic!
Today's News:
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bronzehedwick
4 days ago
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Daaaamn it hurts when he's right.
Brooklyn NY
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Courtney
23 hours ago
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The most accurate diagram about class I have seen in recent memory
Portland, OR
codesujal
1 day ago
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Read the alt text...
West Hartford, CT
norb
4 days ago
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The alt text is SAVAGE
clmbs.oh
CarlEdman
4 days ago
Not so savage when you look at the actual numbers and realize that the reason the "middle class is disappearing" is not wide-spread pauperisation, but a larger and larger fraction of the population has become "rich."
chaosdiscord
3 days ago
There is nothing quite so American as seeing at 4% more of the poulation in the lowest income bracket than in 1971, but pretending it's okay because 7% more of the population moved up to upper-middle or upper income brackets. Meanwhile, the alt text remains savage. http://www.seattletimes.com/business/economy/the-incredible-shrinking-middle-class/

The Right Way to Oppose Trump

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Luigi Zingales, writing for the NYT:

Mr. Berlusconi was able to govern Italy for as long as he did mostly thanks to the incompetence of his opposition. It was so rabidly obsessed with his personality that any substantive political debate disappeared; it focused only on personal attacks, the effect of which was to increase Mr. Berlusconi’s popularity. His secret was an ability to set off a Pavlovian reaction among his leftist opponents, which engendered instantaneous sympathy in most moderate voters. Mr. Trump is no different.

Perfectly applies this very morning. Twitter is full of people talking about Mike Pence getting booed by the audience at Hamilton last night. Now Trump himself is tweeting about it, focusing news media on the incident. Booing is not meaningful opposition. But it has served to distract from a legitimate scandal: Trump settling a fraud lawsuit for $25 million yesterday. The smart opposition is focused on that today.

And the real news — what is happening this week that will have serious repercussions — is that the Trump administration is being filled with cronies, fools, and white nationalist bigots. Trump just nominated an avowed racist to head the Department of Justice and we’re talking about Mike Pence getting booed at a play? If you’re truly opposed to Trump, get serious and stay focused.

bigots.

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bronzehedwick
16 days ago
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We have to be conscious about where we put focus. The media - and everyone - only has so much attention. Point opposition at the incidents that matter most.
Brooklyn NY
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acdha
16 days ago
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I think that's exactly the strategy, and it's working: right now the NYT and WaPo bumped all of the Trump University coverage of the homepage in favor of the Hamilton story.
Washington, DC
jhamill
16 days ago
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Time to get serious and stay focused.
California
wreichard
16 days ago
On the one hand, yes. On the other hand, Mike Conversion Therapy Pence showing up at Hamilton and then getting the president to make vague threats when they called him on it is, in my opinion, also serious.
wreichard
16 days ago
And honestly, I believe that's part of the Trump/Bannon strategy: to create so many fires that people begin to climb over each other to get away.
wmorrell
16 days ago
I suppose dumping a tanker of oil into the "swamp", then lighting a match is one way to "drain" it.
jhamill
15 days ago
@wreichard that does sound like what the Trump transition team is doing, distraction at it's finest.

An OS 9 odyssey: Why these Mac users won’t abandon 16-year-old software

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Enlarge / Andrew Cunningham isn't the only one who's been dabbling in OS 9 within the last five years. (credit: Andrew Cunningham)

Back when Ars Senior Products Editor Andrew Cunningham was forced to work in Mac OS 9 by his colleagues in September 2014, he quickly hit a productivity wall. He couldn't log in to his Ars e-mail or do much of anything online, which meant—as someone who writes about new technology for an online-only publication—he couldn't do his work. All Cunningham could do was play old games and marvel at the difference 15 years makes in operating system design.

But as hard as it may be to believe on the eve of yet another OS X macOS update, there are some who still use Apple's long-abandoned system. OS 9 diehards may hold on due to one important task they just can't replicate on a newer computer, or perhaps they simply prefer it as a daily driver. It only takes a quick trip to the world of subreddits and Facebook groups to verify these users exist.

Certain that they can't all be maniacs, I went searching for these people. I trawled forums and asked around, and I even spent more time with my own classic Macs. And to my surprise, I found that most of the people who cling staunchly to Mac OS 9 (or earlier) as a key component of their daily—or at least regular—workflow actually have good reason for doing so.

Read 40 remaining paragraphs | Comments

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wreichard
85 days ago
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People make me happy.

Also, I can remember when 9 was a huge step up. Yikes.
Earth
zippy72
86 days ago
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I now kinda want to find an emulator and play with OS 9. (Well, it's either that or wait for a G4 notebook to appear in the local Cash Converters...)
FourSquare, qv
bronzehedwick
86 days ago
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I never owned an OS 9 machine, but I still think this is really cool.
Brooklyn NY
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gradualepiphany
85 days ago
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God I hated this OS SO much. First I had to work on a non linear video editing setup running OS8.(5 I think?) and THE OPERATING SYSTEM HAD A MEMORY LEAK. Then I worked doing graphic design at an ad agency the next summer and had to use OS9... Absolute garbage. I have never hated anything as passionately as I hated Apple's twee, precious, insanely underpowered crashhappy crapbuckets. Irix was so much better it hurt.
Los Angeles, California, USA

Man Page

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For even more info, see blarbl(2)(3) and birb(3ahhaha I'm kidding, just Google it like a normal person.
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zippy72
178 days ago
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I'm guilty of writing man pages like that. A looooong loooooong time ago...
FourSquare, qv
bronzehedwick
179 days ago
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This is fantastic
Brooklyn NY
rampras
172 days ago
501 (c) (3) - IRS Exemption :)
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Ferret
179 days ago
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I need this added to all my shells
mooglemoogle
179 days ago
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For easy access:
http://www.inaturalist.org/taxa/47744-Hemiptera
Virginia
nortoon
179 days ago
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One of my favorite XKCDs ever. Reading too many git mans lately.
Illinois

Inside Facebook’s ‘Trending News’ Team

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Michael Nunez, reporting for Gizmodo:

But if you really want to know what Facebook thinks of journalists and their craft, all you need to do is look at what happened when the company quietly assembled some to work on its secretive “trending news” project. The results aren’t pretty: According to five former members of Facebook’s trending news team — “news curators” as they’re known internally — Zuckerberg & Co. take a downright dim view of the industry and its talent. In interviews with Gizmodo, these former curators described grueling work conditions, humiliating treatment, and a secretive, imperious culture in which they were treated as disposable outsiders. After doing a tour in Facebook’s news trenches, almost all of them came to believe that they were there not to work, but to serve as training modules for Facebook’s algorithm. […]

That said, many former employees suspect that Facebook’s eventual goal is to replace its human curators with a robotic one. The former curators Gizmodo interviewed started to feel like they were training a machine, one that would eventually take their jobs. Managers began referring to a “more streamlined process” in meetings. As one former contractor put it: “We felt like we were part of an experiment that, as the algorithm got better, there was a sense that at some point the humans would be replaced.”

If news curation can be automated, there’s nothing inherently wrong with it. Progress in the industrialized world has always involved previously labor-intensive jobs being replaced by automated machinery. We’ve gotten to the point now where some of this work is white collar, not blue collar, and some journalists seem offended by the notion. Their downfall is their dogmatic belief in not having a point-of-view, of contorting themselves to appear not to have a point of view — which, as Jay Rosen has forcefully argued, is effectively a “view from nowhere”. The irony is that machines don’t have a point of view — they are “objective”. Over the last half century or so, mainstream U.S. journalism has evolved in a way that has writers and editors acting like machines. They’ve made it easier for themselves to be replaced by algorithms. Most readers won’t even notice.

I do two things here at DF most days: find interesting things to link to, and comment on them. An algorithm may well beat me at finding interesting links. My job then, is to be a better writer — smarter, funnier, keener, more surprising — than an algorithm could be. When I can’t do that, it’ll be time to hang up the keyboard.

Update: Kevin van Haaren:

@gruber Computers algorithms aren’t objective they reflect the point of view of their creators. It’s a reason diverse teams should make them.

I didn’t mean to imply otherwise, but this is a good point. What I’m saying is more If what you do can be replaced by a robot (whether hardware or software), it will happen — and modern U.S. news journalism’s brand of “objectivity” feels algorithmic.

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bronzehedwick
216 days ago
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I think the ending line sums it up well.
Brooklyn NY
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The Encryption Farce

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Scathing editorial from the WSJ in the wake of the Department of Justice dropping another last-minute “never mind”, this time with an iPhone in a drug case in Brooklyn:

Such assertions were as false in Brooklyn as in San Bernardino. Two hours and a half before a deadline on Friday night, the government withdrew the case after “an individual provided the passcode to the iPhone,” according to legal filings. This second immaculate conception in as many months further undermines the FBI’s credibility about its technological capabilities. Judges ought to exercise far more scrutiny in future decryption cases even as Mr. Comey continues to pose as helpless. […]

Yet forgive us if this “conversation” now seems more like a Jim Comey monologue. The debate might start to be productive if the FBI Director would stop trying to use the courts as an ad hoc policy tool and promised not to bring any more cases like the one in Brooklyn.

The Obama administration does not escape their attention:

Meanwhile, the White House has taken the profile-in-courage stand of refusing to endorse or oppose any encryption bill that Congress may propose. If the Obama team won’t start adjusting to the technological realities of strong and legal encryption, they could at least exercise some adult supervision at Main Justice.

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bronzehedwick
224 days ago
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Yup.
Brooklyn NY
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sirshannon
224 days ago
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Thanks Obama.
satadru
224 days ago
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.
New York, NY
fxer
224 days ago
In a Murdoch vessel no less
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